The Burning Passion

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Photo by: Quinn Dombowski

School vs Learning, by George Couro was based around a new look on school. Couro spend most of the blog focusing on how school and learning are completely different from each other. For example, he wrote, “School often isolates. Learning is often social.” This is able to make sense.  Especially since something in school you can feel alone, or as an outcast. School is suppose to be about learning. Why is there such differences? I think that the differences are about school wanting to follow the standards the regulations, than letting their students to have a greater voice in the classroom.

On 25 ways to Institute Passion-Based Learning in the Classroom, by Saga Briggs gives great examples on how to get students passionate in the classroom. Assisting students is very important. When they are passionate about something they care about it is our responsibility to provide assistance, hard work, change, and development. These are just some of the ones that really appealed to me.

Nine Tenets of Passion-Based Learning by Tina Barseghian is about the different aspects of belief for passion in the classroom. Most of the times students do not have a passion. As a teacher it will be your responsibility to help them find their passion. Once it is found, it will be with your assistance that the passion is able to be controlled by understanding the different codes of passion based learning. This can be accomplished by showing important is life outside of school or by becoming digital citizens.

My biggest passion is history. I always enjoyed history, but it was not until I had Mrs. Wounded-Arrow did I realize how much I loved it. She helped show me the fire that was burning when I was in her classes. Mrs. Wounded-Arrow was one of the first people to push me into having the desire to even become a history teacher. Thanks to her, I am where I am today with my passion.

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4 thoughts on “The Burning Passion

  1. When I read these different articles, the same question kept popping up in my mind: How can we change the image of traditional education? By this I mean that for so long, teachers have just lived and breathed standards related to math, science, reading, writing, etc. That’s what they were expected to teach and to do it well. Teachers never had an expectation to teach students how to be happy and to live out their passions. How do we change that? How do we completely reverse how teachers think now and change into passion based learning?

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    • I think it will be a long challenging road to change this. For starters I think we need to start teaching future teachers passion based earning rather than the standards. Then they can go out and attempt to make a difference within our schools.

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  2. I really appreciated this post. Like you, I did not know that I had a passion for my subject area until a teacher showed it to me in a light that made me realize how important it was. Sometimes these teacher interactions can be the thing that changes a students’ entire life course. As future teachers, this responsibility will soon be in our hands as well.

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